Measure Your Level of Fatigue

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Measure Your Fatigue Level

About Fatigue

Cancer and Fatigue is an Oncologist's Problem

Adrenal Fatigue Syndrome - What Helps, What Doesn't

Natural Remedies For Adrenal Fatigue

Adrenal Fatigue Symptoms

Chronic Fatigue Syndrome is Much More Common Than You Think

Do I Have Chronic Fatigue?

How to Reduce Fatigue and Help Stop Feeling Tired All the Time

Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS) - Symptoms and Diagnosis Part 2

Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS) - Symptoms and Diagnosis Part 1

Chronic Fatigue Syndrome - Ayurvedic Herbal Treatment

Treatment For Chronic Fatigue Symptoms - Sunshine

MS and Fatigue - Learn How to Pace Yourself

Back Pain and Fatigue - What is the Connection?

Can a Colon and Liver Cleanse Get Rid of Your Fatigue?

Fibromyalgia Fatigue - Exhaustion Multiplied

Fatigue

Fatigue may be defined as a subjective state in which one feels tired or exhausted, and in which the capacity for normal work or activity is reduced. There is, however, no commonly accepted definition of fatigue when it is considered in the context of health and illness. This lack of definition results from the fact that a person's experience of fatigue depends on a variety of factors. These factors include culture, personality, the physical environment (light, noise, vibration), availability of social support through networks of family members and friends, the nature of a particular fatiguing disease or disorder, and the type and duration of work or exercise. The experience of fatigue associated with disease will be different for someone who is clinically depressed, is socially isolated, and is out of shape, as compared to another person who is not depressed, has many friends, and is aerobically fit.1

Cancer-related fatigue is one of the most common side effects of cancer and its treatment. It is not predictable by tumor type, treatment, or stage of illness. Usually, it comes on suddenly, does not result from activity or exertion, and is not relieved by rest or sleep. It is often described as "paralyzing" and may continue even after treatment is complete. 2

What is Cancer-Related Fatigue?

Fatigue is a daily lack of energy; it is excessive whole-body tiredness not relieved by sleep. It can last for a short time (a month or less) or stay around for longer (1-6 months or longer). Fatigue can prevent you from functioning normally and gets in the way of things you enjoy or need to do.

Cancer-related fatigue is one of the most common side effects of cancer and its treatment. It is not predictable by tumor type, treatment, or stage of illness. Usually, it comes on suddenly, does not result from activity or exertion, and is not relieved by rest or sleep. It is often described as "paralyzing" and may continue even after treatment is complete.2

 

1. "fatigue." Gale Encyclopedia of Neurological Disorders. The Gale Group, Inc, 2005. Answers.com 26 May. 2006. http://www.answers.com/topic/fatigue

2. "Cancer Related Fatigue ." MedicineNet. MedicineNet Inc., 2001. http://www.medicinenet.com/cancer_fatigue/article.htm

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